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Eucharist

The Sacrament of Eucharist, also known as "Holy Communion", is the third of the Sacraments of Initiation. Even though we are required to receive Communion at least once per year (our Easter Duty), and the Church urges us to receive Communion frequently (even daily, if possible), it is called a Sacrament of Initiation because, like Baptism and Confirmation, it brings us into the fullness of our life in Christ.

In Holy Communion, we are eating the True Body and Blood of Jesus Christ, without which "you shall not have life in you" (John 6:53).

Because of the intimate connection of the Sacrament of Holy Communion to our life in Christ, we must be free of any grave or mortal sin before receiving it, as St. Paul explained in 1 Corinthians 11:27-29. Otherwise, as he warns, we receive the Sacrament unworthily, and we "eateth and drinketh damnation" to ourselves.

If we are aware of having committed a mortal sin, we must participate in the Sacrament of Reconciliation first. The Church sees the two Sacraments as connected and urges us, when we can, to join frequent Reconciliation with frequent Communion.

Published on Apr 3, 2016

If you want to say the word, “word” in Latin, there are two choices. You can say “scriptum” or you can say “verbum.” There is a very important distinction between the two words and the Church is very specific about the way she uses them in the text of the Mass.

Published on Nov 15, 2015

We Christians are here on earth as exiles. Many of us grow up in middle class Christianity. The danger with that is that we have everything we want and as a consequence we don’t really long for heaven. In this episode we learn what the role of the parishioner is in the Catholic Mass.

Published on Jul 12, 2011

This exclusive clip is from Episode 7 of CATHOLICISM, entitled BREAD OF HEAVEN - The Mystery of the Church's Sacrament and Worship.

In Episode 7, Father Barron explores the ancient practices of the Church's worship that endure to this very day, and the notion that "all value is summed up in the liturgy, the supreme act by which we commune with God.

Considered by the Catholic Faith to be "the source and summit" of its identity and mission, the Eucharist is the central practice of the Church's culture. Father Barron describes all the parts of the Mass, and shows how the Sacred Liturgy embodies the whole of the Faith in diverse places as Jerusalem, Rome, Chicago, Orvieto, Mexico City.